State Services Commission, August 2008.

Key Facts

  • Satisfaction with justice and security services was 68%, exactly the same as the survey average.
  • This service grouping performed well on having competent staff and taking individual circumstances into account, but less well on staff keeping their promises.
  • Satisfaction with contacting justice and security services presents a mixed picture: services were seen as easy to access but there was relatively high dissatisfaction with the contact methods used compared with other service groupings.

Introduction

Kiwis Count is the first all-of-government survey to ask New Zealanders about their perceptions and experiences of public services.

Kiwis Count prompted New Zealanders about their experiences with a list of 42 services which broadly represented services provided by central and local government, tertiary education institutions and kindergartens. These services were categorised into nine service groupings. This factsheet sets out some key information for the justice and security grouping.

Below are the services included in this grouping along with the percentage of New Zealanders who had used them in the past 12 months.

Service

%

The Police (for a non-emergency situation)

24

Paying fines or getting information about fines

18

Emergency services

13

Parole Board hearings

1

The most commonly used service in the grouping was the Police, with nearly a quarter of New Zealanders having had contact with them. Fines and emergency services were also relatively commonly used but only a small number of New Zealanders had contact with Parole Board hearings.

Who's using justice and security services?

New Zealanders who had used justice and security services in the past 12 months were more likely to be male (57% compared with 43% female). However, in many ways the profile of New Zealanders using justice and security services matched survey averages. Slightly fewer were over 65 (11% compared with a survey average of 15%), slightly fewer were Asian (7% compared with 10%) and slightly more were Māori (15% compared with 11%). Income distribution was also similar, although fewer had incomes of under $15,000 per annum (20% compared with a survey average of 25%) and more had incomes of more than $50,000 per annum (32% compared with 25%).

Why are they using justice and security services?

Nearly half of New Zealanders who used justice and security services did so to get help or advice with a problem. Relatively few contacted them to use, apply for or request a specific service (19% compared with a survey average of 59%). 11% of New Zealanders made contact to report an incident, give evidence or make a statement, and 11% contacted them to get information. 9% contacted them for other reasons but did not specify what these were.

New Zealanders using justice and security services were more likely to have done so out of choice rather than because they felt it was a government requirement: 59% compared with a survey average of 51%. Only a quarter contacted them because they felt it was a government requirement, compared with a survey average of 32%.

How are they contacting justice and security services?

Just over half of New Zealanders using justice and security services called them on the telephone, higher than the survey average of 24%. The second most common contact method was to visit an office or location (21% compared with a survey average of 47%). This service grouping had the highest proportion of contacts through receiving a visit, 10% compared with a survey average of 2%.

Two thirds of New Zealanders using justice and security services were satisfied with the contact method they had used, slightly below the average of 70%. However, 20% were dissatisfied, the second highest proportion of all the service groupings. Comparing preferred contact methods with actual contact methods shows a similar profile, although a higher proportion said they would prefer to receive a visit (15%) than the proportion who actually received one (10%). Justice and security services rated well on satisfaction with calling on the telephone in contrast to the survey as a whole where calling on the telephone had the lowest satisfaction rating. For the survey as a whole, visiting an office or location had the highest satisfaction rating.

Justice and security services were rated higher than average for accessing services: 79% of those using justice and security services felt they were easy to access on their most recent service experience, compared with a survey average of 74%.

Performance against the drivers

New Zealanders were asked about satisfaction with their most recent service experience. Satisfaction with justice and security services was exactly average, at 68%.

Kiwis Count measured satisfaction in relation to the six main 'drivers', or factors, which influence New Zealanders' satisfaction with public services. The results were broken down into the nine service groupings. The following graph shows average satisfaction and satisfaction for justice and security services.

Justice and security services performed best on 'staff were competent' and least well on 'it's an example of good value for tax dollars spent', however performance was above average for this driver. This service grouping performed above average on all the drivers except for 'staff kept their promises', where there was only one percentage point difference. Justice and security services performed much better than average on 'your individual circumstances were taken into account', which may reflect the nature of the services provided.

Performance against the drivers of satisfaction for most recent service experience

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Conclusions

Justice and security services were close to the survey average on many aspects of Kiwis Count. On the drivers of satisfaction, this service grouping performed well on 'staff were competent' and 'your individual circumstances were taken into account'. Performance was poorest on 'it's an example of good value for tax dollars spent' (although above the survey average for this driver) and was slightly below the survey average on 'staff kept their promises'. Satisfaction with accessing services shows a mixed picture: ratings were higher than average for ease of accessing services, however dissatisfaction with contact methods was relatively high compared with other service groupings. As justice and security services were rated well on satisfaction with the telephone, it may be that the problem lies with other contact methods and further analysis would show if this is the case.

For more information

See the SSC website:

publicservice.govt.nz/kiwis-count-research-survey

or email:

newzealanders.experience@publicservice.govt.nz

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